Tyger Drew-Honey on revenge porn and the dangers of Snapchat

The Outnumbered star says that sending nude photos has replaced old-fashioned "romantic courting", and that the misuse of private images is a "dangerous weapon" in our society

imagenotavailable1

Tyger Drew-Honey has spoken out against the dangers of so-called “revenge porn” and the abuse of trust surrounding image-sharing apps like Snapchat. 

Advertisement

Speaking at an event called Sex, Porn and Generation XXX at the Cheltenham Literature Festival, the Outnumbered and Cuckoo star expressed his concern about the trend for sending nude images via social media and apps.

“Theres no trust in things like that,” said Drew-Honey, “because we get things like revenge porn. And if you ever send a picture to someone and then you break up with them, that’s a weapon. And it’s a really dangerous weapon in our society because it can cause so much pain and so much heartache and even stop people potentially getting jobs.”

The recent iCloud hack that released dozens of nude photos of celebrities to the internet was closely followed by a second incident on Sunday that saw more than 90,000 images of members of the public, many explicit, released on social media. Hackers stole photographs, dating back to October 2013, via Snapchat, a social app that lets users send pictures that self-delete after a few seconds.

Sending temporary messages which seem to disappear into the ether and leave less of a digital footprint than posting an image on Twitter or Facebook, has proved so appealing that 350 million photos are shared each day via the app.

In reponse to last week’s hacking, and the security concerns about third-party services like Snapchat, the government has just passed new UK laws clamping down on so-called “revenge porn” – the malicious sharing of explicit content without the subject’s consent. 

Drew-Honey this year made a BBC3 documentary about porn in which he lifted the lid on how easy access to hardcore material online is affecting his generation, and has been vocal about the unhealthy sexual pressures faced by his peers. The actor’s parents are Linzi Drew, a former adult model, and Simon Honey, a highly successful porn producer better known as Ben Dover, so Drew-Honey has a particular insight into the area of debate.

At Cheltenham, the actor talked specifically about why young people feel they have to take nude selfies.

“I’m only 18 so as long as I’ve been cool enough to own a mobile phone, naked pictures have been around. So I’ve grown up in this new age, inundated with social media and mobile phones.

“Years before I was born, when you were engaging in a relationship with someone or courting someone to a point where you would be close enough to have sex with them, you wouldn’t be texting them all the time and you would be going on dates and becoming more intimate and romantic as a much slower pace.

Advertisement

“Now, Snapchat, to me, is just calling out for people to be sending nudes to each other. And when you’re doing that it really degrades the actual privacy of someone’s body and how special it can be to have that proper bond with someone and have built on it.”