Jack Warner hits YouTube to attack “comedian fool” John Oliver for Fifa jibes

The former Fifa vice president goes online to challenge the Last Week Tonight host after he took out an ad on Trinidad and Tobago TV

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You’d think a former Fifa vice president charged with corruption would have more important things to worry about than a British comedian poking fun at him. You’d be wrong.

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Jack Warner, one of 14 people charged with racketeering by the US Department of Justice, hit back at Last Week Tonight host John Oliver online after he appeared in an advert on Trinidad and Tobago TV mocking the former Fifa executive.

Oliver bought TV ad time in Trinidad and Tobago (Warner’s home country) urging him to keep his promise to release an “avalanche” of files that may link Fifa president Sepp Blatter to the corruption scandal.

The ad, called The Mittens of Disapproval Are On, features Oliver in the Last Week Tonight studio encouraging Warner to “release everything”.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=alwba8V1csY

Warner took exception to the mocking tone, and decided to release his own video in response, complete with maudlin piano soundtrack.

In it, he accuses Oliver of mocking his country “and the way we speak”, before going on to call him a “comedian fool” as the music builds to almost incoherent levels.

“I don’t need any advice from any comedian fool who doesn’t know anything about this country,” he says. “To tell me what file to release or not to release. That is not his business. I take no instructions from him. And worse yet, I won’t take any instructions from an American at this point in time.”

Whether or not you think Warner has a point over Oliver’s “Trinidadian slang”, the disgraced former Fifa executive appears to miss the point that it is he, not Trinidad, who is the target of the piece.

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Oh, and just to clear up Warner’s confusion: John Oliver is a British comedian on an American show. Perhaps that makes him even more repellent given Fifa’s less-than-cosy relationship with the British press.