Easter 2015: best TV on today, Easter Monday

Let's finish off Easter weekend with a night of soaps, antique detectives and a brand new drama, Code of a Killer

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Antiques Roadshow Detectives, 7.00pm, BBC2

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Antiques Roadshow viewers will only recently have seen Annie Hammerton with the escutcheon (painted panel) supposedly from Oliver Cromwell’s funeral. According to Hammerton family legend it was taken by a cheeky young boy who pushed through the crowds and snatched it from the hearse.

But is it genuine, wonders expert Hilary Kay, who was so transfixed by the piece. At the start of a new series of Roadshow Detectives, she takes the escutcheon to be analysed, though not before both she and Annie Hammerton have attended an auction of a copper plate bearing Cromwell’s coat of arms from the coffin of the Lord Protector’s exhumed body. It has a reserve price of £12,000, but bidding quickly goes wildly beyond everyone’s expectations. 

In another touching Roadshow after-story, an American academic is overwhelmed by a pretty enamel Arts and Crafts portrait. Alison Graham


Coronation Street, 7.30pm, ITV1 

Antiques Roadshow viewers will only recently have seen Annie Hammerton with the escutcheon (painted panel) supposedly from Oliver Cromwell’s funeral. According to Hammerton family legend it was taken by a cheeky young boy who pushed through the crowds and snatched it from the hearse.

But is it genuine, wonders expert Hilary Kay, who was so transfixed by the piece. At the start of a new series of Roadshow Detectives, she takes the escutcheon to be analysed, though not before both she and Annie Hammerton have attended an auction of a copper plate bearing Cromwell’s coat of arms from the coffin of the Lord Protector’s exhumed body. It has a reserve price of £12,000, but bidding quickly goes wildly beyond everyone’s expectations. 

In another touching Roadshow after-story, an American academic is overwhelmed by a pretty enamel Arts and Crafts portrait. David Brown


EastEnders, 8.00pm, BBC1

I wonder if Mick will one day look back and realise that moving to Walford was the moment that everything started to go wrong. 

Before the Carters took over at the Vic, Mick was living in blissful ignorance, unaware that Shirley was his mum and not his sister and that Stan was his granddad and not his dad. Dean hadn’t wormed his way into his life, Linda always had a smile on her face and life was grand. Now look at him! 

Poor Mick is reeling from the reappearance of Buster Briggs, he’s daggers drawn with Shirley and facing up to the imminent demise of Stan. Owning that pub is cursed, I tell you. Cursed! David Brown


Travel Man: 48 Hours in Istanbul, 8.30pm, Channel 4 

There’s no great secret to this, but it is the kind of programme you realise you have been smiling through most of, partly because the presenters seem to have such fun making it. Terminally sardonic host Richard Ayoade and guest Adam Hills joke their way through a weekend in Istanbul, doing enjoyably touristy things: a tot of Raki, a fortune teller, a trip to the bazaar, and so on. 

There’s some high-octane rug-price negotiation and a lovely moment where Ayoade enquires about the benefits of the “natural Viagra tea” for sale in the bazaar. “Like a wild horse…?” he enquires drily, looking as unlike a wild horse as any presenter ever has. David Butcher


MasterChef, 8:30pm, BBC1

Can we get one thing out of the way before we begin? Will Gregg Wallace please stop calling contestants, both men and women, “mate”. Seriously, this has to end right now. We’re in the MasterChef kitchen, not at a jellied eel stall. 

OK, on with the show. It’s knockout week. Twelve hopefuls remain and they meet for the first time for one great big cook-off. John Torode wants “a main course with true origin, it has a reason, a story, a reality” (crikey, is he talking about food or a first novel?). Gregg Wallace, on the other hand, wants a big pudding. ’Twas ever thus. Alison Graham


Code of a Killer, 9.00pm, ITV1 

The greatest leap forward in the detection of crime, the establishment of genetic fingerprinting, is reduced to the standard component parts of a TV drama: a dogged cop facing pressure from above, a passionately committed scientist who gets in trouble with his wife for missing his daughter’s school play, and slow-motion camerawork during the sad bits. And for some reason Placebo’s mournful version of Kate Bush’s Running Up That Hill at the end.

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It’s steady and workmanlike, which is somehow not good enough for a truly remarkable story (read Joseph Wambaugh’s account in his book The Blooding), the first definitive use of DNA profiling to catch a killer. John Simm plays real-life scientist and geneticist Alec Jeffreys, with David Threlfall as Det Chief Supt David Baker, who pursued the man who raped and murdered two teenage girls – Lynda Mann and Dawn Ashworth – in Leicestershire in the 1980s. Alison Graham