The 12 best dramas coming to TV this summer

Poldark isn't the only series to hit the small screen in the next few months: from Strike with Tom Burke, to Tamsin Greig in Diana, there's plenty of TV to stay in for

7. The State

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Summer C4

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What’s it about?

Peter Kosminsky (Wolf Hall director) follows the experiences of four Brits who join Isis in Syria.

Who’s in it?

This is the first acting project for the majority of the cast.

Why watch it?

In an unflinching depiction of the realities of life under Isis, The State is said to be an authentic drama, confronting one of the most important issues of our time.

8. Strike

August BBC1

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What’s it about?

Cormoran Strike is a war veteran, recluse and the illegitimate son of a rock star — but more importantly, he’s also one of the sharpest investigators in the country, parlaying his experience in the military police into work as a private detective. Tackling three complex cases that have baffled the police, the gloomy Strike (along with his trusty partner Robin) will have to face murderers, liars and traitors as his adventures continue — not to mention the worst of Britain’s press when details of his cases become public knowledge.

Who’s in it?

Tom Burke, Holliday Grainger and Martin Shaw.

Why watch it?

The series is based on Harry Potter author JK Rowling’s other bestselling books (written under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith), and if it captures the spirit of the critically acclaimed Strike novels, it’s sure to be as big a smash as her other work.

9. Trust Me

July BBC1

What’s it about?

Skilled nurse Cath Hardacre usually tries to do the right thing — but when she’s sacked for whistle-blowing, her desperate circumstances make her steal a friend’s identity and pose as a senior doctor in Edinburgh. It all starts well, but just how long is that façade going to last?

Who’s in it?

Jodie Whittaker, Emun Elliott and Sharon Small.

Why watch it?

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“I’ve worked as a doctor within the NHS for most of my adult life,” says writer Dan Sefton, “so I know only too well that it provides the perfect setting for a contemporary drama — the characters, the (often literal) pain — as well as the affection and dedication of staff.”