When is Death in Paradise back on TV?

The BBC has announced not one but TWO new series of Death in Paradise

Death in Paradise cast

Death in Paradise series eight has come to an end – but don’t worry, the much-loved Caribbean murder drama will be back for more.

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Here’s what you need to know…


Will there be another series of Death in Paradise?

CONFIRMED: Death in Paradise will return for not one but two more series, filming once again in Guadaloupe.

The BBC1 crime drama has been recommissioned for a ninth and tenth outing following its eighth successful run, with a consolidated audience of 8.9 million for the 2019 series premiere.

Death in Paradise - Jack Mooney

Tommy Bulfin, BBC Drama Commissioning Editor, said: “We are delighted to announce that Death in Paradise is coming back to BBC1. The show is a jewel in our roster of top drama and we are thrilled that it’s returning.”

“We’re excited to let the audience get to know our new characters better whilst also throwing some major surprises into the mix along the way – and of course solving the odd murder or sixteen,” added Tim Key, executive producer at Red Planet Pictures.

There had previously been a question mark over the show’s future after creator and writer Robert Thorogood told RadioTimes.com in November 2017 that a hard Brexit could make filming in Guadeloupe extremely difficult.

“Guadeloupe is an overseas territory of France, so it’s part of the EU, which makes it really easy to film there. If we left the single market, it could make things much harder for us,” he said. “So, like the rest of the UK, we’re just going to have to wait and see what happens after Brexit.”


When is Death in Paradise back on TV?

Having finished series eight in the UK on 28th February 2019, an air date for the next series has yet to be announced – but the drama usually launches at the beginning of each year, meaning we can hopefully look forward to series nine in January 2020.


Is Madeleine joining Death in Paradise full time as the “new Florence”?

AUDE LEGASTELOIS as Madeleine in Death in Paradise

Yes! Despite a slightly ambiguous ending to series eight, the BBC has now confirmed that DS Madeleine Dumas is here to stay – and actress Aude Legastelois will be a series regular.

Having arrived in Saint Marie to investigate Florence’s shooting and make a report on DI Jack Mooney’s unusual crime-solving methods, Madeleine made her debut in the last two episodes of series eight. She was soon drafted in to help the team solve a seemingly-impossible murder and began to fall in love with the island.

Joining the Honoré Police, Madeleine takes the place of DS Florence Cassell (Joséphine Jobert) as Jack’s second-in-command.

Aude Legastelois said: “I’m thrilled that I’ve been given the opportunity to continue my role as Madeleine and to rejoin the cast of Death in Paradise. I can’t wait for Madeleine to be fully integrated into the Honoré Police team and for the viewers to get to know her further.”


Who will star in Death in Paradise series nine?

Death in Paradise

Ardal O’Hanlon returns as lead detective DI Jack Mooney, heading up the team at the Saint Marie police force which also includes Officer JP Hooper (Tobi Bakare), Officer Ruby Patterson (Shyko Amos), and newcomer DS Madeleine Dumas (Aude Legastelois).

Don Warrington is back to play Commissioner Selwyn Patterson, while Elizabeth Bourgine plays bar owner Catherine Bordey.

Joséphine Jobert will NOT return as DS Florence Cassell after her dramatic exit towards the end of series eight, although hopefully our cast will make some off-screen visits to see her in Martinique.

It also seems that Officer Dwayne Myers (Danny John-Jules) who left before the beginning of series eight, will not be making a comeback. According to Jack Mooney, he’s currently on a sailing adventure around the world with his long-lost father.

The BBC also promises a “star-studded array of guest cast” for series nine – series eight saw the likes of Richard Blackwood, Angus Deayton, Anna Chancellor, Blake Harrison and Rebecca Front all appear.

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This article was originally published on 28 February 2019


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