What time is Theresa May’s Florence Brexit speech and where can I watch it?

Everything we know so far about the UK Prime Minister's critical speech about negotiations with the European Union

Theresa May

What time is Theresa May’s Florence Brexit speech?

Although no exact time has been given for the speech in the Italian city, it is thought that Theresa May will make her address at some point in the early afternoon, with 2.15pm being touted as a possible start time by some media outlets.

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Where can I watch the speech on TV?

The major rolling news channels will cover the speech live, including the BBC News Channel and Sky News. Watch online via BBC iPlayer or the Sky News website.

Who will be in Florence?

It is understood that UK Prime Minister Theresa May will make an approximately 5,000 word speech flanked by senior cabinet colleagues. We expect May to be joined by Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson and Chancellor Phillip Hammond, who have over the past few months both been quite publicly advocating different Brexit models for the UK. After a marathon Cabinet meeting in London on Thursday, it is understood the PM’s team are in broad agreement with the proposals she is expected to set out in the speech.

What is the Prime Minster expected to say in her Florence address?

Although the exact text of the speech remains a closely guarded secret and could well be edited up until the last minute, it is largely expected that Theresa May will announce that the UK wishes to enter into a transitional arrangement with the European Union after it officially leaves the EU in March 2019, and in turn that Britain will honour its financial commitments to the EU and continue to pay into the EU budget during this period.

The speech is designed to ‘break the deadlock’ in negotiations with the EU, with talks due to resume on Monday.

The EU’s chief negotiator Michel Barnier said on Thursday ahead of the speech that he was looking for “clear commitments” from the UK on issues including EU citizens’ rights in the UK, the Brexit ‘divorce bill’ and the Northern Ireland border.

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Without answers to these issues, there could be no transition deal, he said.