What time is The Great Pottery Throw Down on TV?

Everything you need to know about the top potter contest

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The Great Pottery Throw Down follows ten potters from around the country as they head to Stoke-on-Trent, the home of pottery, in their quest to become Top Potter. Basically, it’s a pottery version of Bake Off presented by Sara Cox, where people say ‘pottery’ a LOT. Here’s everything you need to know about the POTTERY show.

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When is it next on TV?

The final of the show is on BBC2 at 8pm Thursday 23rd March.

Who are the judges?

Expert potters Kate Malone and Keith Brymer Jones.

Who is presenting?

Sara Cox. She presented the Radio 1 Breakfast Show from 2000-3, but now is best known for her work on Radio 2, where she hosts Sounds of the 80s.

She’s also done plenty of TV in her time, previously presenting The Album Chart Show and the Children in Need episode of The Great British Sewing Bee. Cox also starred in last year’s special of The Crystal Maze to raise money for Stand Up To Cancer.

What can I expect from the show?

The three Throw Down finalists get into a bit of a tizz when presented with their very last challenge, to sculpt a human torso. Their life model is a presentable and very buff young French gentleman who takes his top off, much to the giggling delight of a flirtatious Sara Cox.

But this is a serious business, of course, and by the end someone will be crowned king or queen of the Great Pottery Throw Down. The main task is a brute, to make a pair of identical porcelain lights, which must be wired up and working before they are judged by Keith ‘Tears for Fears’ Brymer Jones and Kate Malone.

Porcelain is a beast to work with, it dries quickly and can snap, as the contestants learn to their cost. “It’s all gone a bit Titanic,” says one ruefully as he surveys the wreckage.

Review by Alison Graham

How many innuendos will there be?

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Probably quite a lot, judging by previous episodes. Expect a plentiful of split bottoms, copious amounts of cracks and more jugs than a Carry On film.