When is The Surjury on TV? Who is hosting? What is the show about? Have Channel 4 responded to criticism?

The controversial new show has caused a stir already…

Caroline-Flack-The-Surjury-Channel-4

Channel 4 is no stranger to controversial commissions, having never been afraid to experiment with some slightly daring formats.

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The channel is home to Sex Box (which saw couples experiment sexually in a small cell on TV), The Circle (the first ever social media un-reality show) and The Tribe Next Door, which saw The Moffatt family of Gogglebox fame quite literally take their semi-detached house to Nambia to observe the habits of the Himba tribe.

However, there has been much discussion on whether The Surjury is just a step too far, with the newly-announced reality show having already been widely criticised before the first episode has even aired.

Here’s all you need to know about The Surjury…

When is The Surjury on TV?

A launch date for The Surjury is yet to be confirmed by Channel 4, but we can expect it to launch in the new year. Check back at RadioTimes.com for confirmation.

Who is hosting The Surjury?

Caroline Flack on Love Island (ITV)
Caroline Flack on Love Island (ITV)

Love Island frontwoman Caroline Flack is at the helm of The Surjury, which marks the first time she’s ever hosted a Channel 4 show.

“We’re delighted to have Caroline on board,” said Becky Cadman, Factual Entertainment Commissioner at Channel 4.

Ross McCarthy, CEO and Executive Producer for Gobstopper Television, the production company behind The Surjury, added: “Caroline is the perfect safe pair of hands for a format that taps into the social phenomenon of elective surgery.”

What is The Surjury about?

Never mind the awful, pun-driven title, The Surjury’s subject matter has raised several eyebrows amongst both TV critics and viewers.

According to its press release, The Surjury “allows people to explore their choices more thoroughly and to take measured advice from their peers, some of whom may previously have gone under the knife themselves and will happily share their views and experiences.”

In order win the surgery they so crave, candidates requesting surgery must secure the majority of the jury vote in order to get their procedure. Months later they’ll be invited back to show the results.

Host Flack will be on hand to introduce those wanting the surgery to the Jury, sharing facts about the procedures and the cosmetic surgery that they are requesting.
“[The Surjury] allows those who make a strong enough case to their peers, to undergo the procedure of their choice,” Cadman said,

“The show will neither glamorise nor condemn their choices: the aim is instead to interrogate the realities.”

Has The Surjury received backlash?

Jameela Jamil in The Good Place
Jameela Jamil in The Good Place (Getty)

Unsurprisingly, The Surjury’s concept has been widely criticised for encouraging plastic surgery to a young and impressionable audience.

Flack’s inclusion has also been frowned upon, particularly as she’s also the host of Love Island, which itself has faced criticism after plastic surgery was advertising during the show.

Jameela Jamil slammed the show on social media, comparing it to Black Mirror – which saw Flack hit back that she couldn’t criticise the show without having seen it.

A spokesperson from Channel 4 told RadioTimes.com: “Cosmetic surgery has become an increasingly mainstream choice in Britain. The Surjury seeks to explore why so many people feel the need to change their bodies, and whether surgery actually makes them happier.

“All contributors featured in the series have actively been seeking surgery of their own accord. This new series allows them to consult with surgical teams and then to discuss their reasons for wanting it with a panel of their peers. If their peers support their decision they will undergo the procedure of their choice subject to the usual surgical checks and consent processes.

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“The show will neither glamorise nor condemn their choices: the aim is instead to interrogate the realities of cosmetic surgery. Duty of care to contributors is of paramount importance and all will be independently assessed by the clinic who will carry out their procedure. They will be psychologically assessed and supported regarding their involvement in the programme.”