The Radio Times logo

Lost Highway

  • 1996
  • David Lynch
  • 128 mins
  • 18

Summary

Psychological thriller from director David Lynch, starring Bill Pullman, Patricia Arquette and Balthazar Getty. Jazz saxophonist Fred Madison receives a series of videotapes showing the interior of the house he shares with his wife Renee. As the tapes become increasingly menacing and violent, Fred is plagued by nightmarish visions of a mystery man.

Advertisement

Review

A star rating of 4 out of 5.

Four years after the Twin Peaks phenomenon, David Lynch came up with this narrative-defying psychological thriller about a jazz saxophonist in a disturbed domestic limbo (an exemplary Bill Pullman), who suddenly and inexplicably transforms into a younger man (Balthazar Getty). Though never together in a scene, the men share what appears to be the same elusive, deceptive woman (Patricia Arquette in contrasting wigs). It's not the most accessible scenario, but the delivery is hypnotising. And, while other modern films about bad people, paranoia and deceptive women get labelled film noir, Lynch reinvents the form rather than just relying on its storyline formula. Painterly, impenetrable and creepy, but never consciously hip, this is a painful, nightmarish vision of suffering and yearning that echoes Hitchcock's Vertigo, another great work that was under-appreciated in its day.

How to watch

Loading

Credits

Cast

rolename
Fred MadisonBill Pullman
Renee Madison / Alice WakefieldPatricia Arquette
Pete DaytonBalthazar Getty
Mystery manRobert Blake
SheilaNatasha Gregson Wagner
Mr Eddy / Dick LaurentRobert Loggia
Bill DaytonGary Busey
ArnieRichard Pryor
AndyMichael Massee
Guard HenryHenry Rollins
PhilJack Nance
ForewomanMink Stole
Steve "V"Giovanni Ribisi
Porno Star No 1Marilyn Manson
Porno Star No 1Twiggy Ramirez

Crew

rolename
DirectorDavid Lynch

Details

Theatrical distributor
Polygram Filmed Entertainment
Languages
English
Guidance
Contains violence, swearing, sex scenes and nudity.
Available on
video, DVD and Blu-ray
Formats
Colour
Advertisement
Advertisement

RadioTimes.com is getting better. Fresh new look, redesigned programme hub, richer content…

FIND OUT MORE
Advertisement

Sponsored content