What time is Blue Planet II episode 5 on TV? Where is it filmed, and what animals are featured?

Episode five, 'Green Seas', explores the ocean's 'forests', from dense mangrove and seaweed jungles to vast blooms of algae

A common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) filmed in a kelp forest off South Africa. Masters of disguise, they constantly sense the world around them and are capable of changing their colour in an instant with their pixel-like skin (BBC, JG)

After the vast expanses of the open oceans, Blue Planet II returns to the shallows for episode five’s ‘Green Seas’.

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What time is Blue Planet II episode 5 on TV?

The latest episode begins at 8pm on BBC1 this Sunday 26th November.

The team behind this episode spent 196 days filming and 664 hours diving in order to capture the wonders of the ‘green seas’.

Find out more about some of the locations and animals featured below.

Giant Spider Crab and Stingray – Victoria, Australia

A horde of spider crab emerge into the shallows, gathering to shed their old shells and build up new ones. However, with their defences down, they are a prime target for predators…

A giant spider crab (Leptomithrax gaimardii) emerging from the shell it has outgrown. Each year, they march into the shallows in great numbers in order to molt before returning to deeper waters (BBC, JG)
A giant spider crab (Leptomithrax gaimardii) emerging from the shell it has outgrown. Each year, they march into the shallows in great numbers in order to molt before returning to deeper waters (BBC)

Tiger Shark and Green Turtle – Western Australia

In the seagrass prairies off Australia, turtles play a dangerous game of hide and seek in the shallows. This is prime grazing territory for the turtles, but predators are never far away.

A green turtle (Chelonia mydas) swimming over seagrass in tropical waters off Green Island, Australia (BBC, JG)
A green turtle (Chelonia mydas) swimming over seagrass in tropical waters off Green Island, Australia (BBC)

Giant Australian Cuttlefish – South Australia

A giant cuttlefish (Sepia apama), one of thousands that gather for an annual mating aggregation each winter (BBC, JG)
A giant cuttlefish (Sepia apama), one of thousands that gather for an annual mating aggregation each winter (BBC)

The largest cuttlefish species in the world, over 10 kg in weight, gather in northern Spencer Gulf in South Australia – the only known spawning ground in the world.

Common Octopus and Pyjama Shark – South Africa

An incredible film shows how octopus fight back against vicious pyjama sharks. The shark attempts to root out the octopus, but instead finds a surprising battle on its hands.

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Sea Otters – North American Pacific coast

Sea otters (Enhydra lutris), Monterey Bay, California, USA. Sea otters must eat around 30% of their body weight every day but, when not hunting, they rest by floating on their backs, frequently wrapping themselves in fronds of kelp for better stability (BBC, JG)
Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) in Monterey Bay, California, USA. When not hunting, sea otters rest by floating on their backs, wrapping themselves in kelp for better stability (BBC)