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Nature's Microworlds

  • Season 1
  • 13 episodes
  • Documentary
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Episode 2: Serengeti

Summary

The documentary series exploring some of the world's most famous ecosystems continues, this time focusing on the Serengeti, the east African grassland that has become home to some of the greatest concentrations of herbivores on the continent. Steve Backshall explains how this landscape developed into such a diverse and densely populated habitat.

Review

It’s nice to see the appliance of science taking hold in nature documentaries. Following Secrets of Our Living Planet and the Volcano Live experiments, it’s Chris Backshall’s turn (helped by stunning photography by Owen Newman and Charlie Hamilton-James) to explain how phosphates, laid down over millennia, just under the soil of the Serengeti have encouraged grasses, while controlling tree growth. The grasses help the area’s million and a half wildebeest to prosper, which in turn keeps predators fat and happy.

It’s a neat half-hour lesson, with an enthusiastic narration by Backshall: the wildebeest are called “a living larder for Africa’s killer carnivores”.


How to watch

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Details

Formats
Colour

Credits

Cast

rolename
NarratorSteve Backshall

Crew

rolename
Executive producerWendy Darke
Executive producerCerys Griffiths
Series producerDoug Hope

All episodes

  • Episode 2

    Serengeti

    Summary

    The documentary series exploring some of the world's most famous ecosystems continues, this time focusing on the Serengeti, the east African grassland that has become home to some of the greatest concentrations of herbivores on the continent. Steve Backshall explains how this landscape developed into such a diverse and densely populated habitat.

    Review

    It’s nice to see the appliance of science taking hold in nature documentaries. Following Secrets of Our Living Planet and the Volcano Live experiments, it’s Chris Backshall’s turn (helped by stunning photography by Owen Newman and Charlie Hamilton-James) to explain how phosphates, laid down over millennia, just under the soil of the Serengeti have encouraged grasses, while controlling tree growth. The grasses help the area’s million and a half wildebeest to prosper, which in turn keeps predators fat and happy.

    It’s a neat half-hour lesson, with an enthusiastic narration by Backshall: the wildebeest are called “a living larder for Africa’s killer carnivores”.


    How to watch

    Loading

    Details

    Formats
    Colour

    Credits

    Cast

    rolename
    NarratorSteve Backshall

    Crew

    rolename
    Executive producerWendy Darke
    Executive producerCerys Griffiths
    Series producerDoug Hope
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