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David Stratton's Stories of Australian Cinema

  • Season 1
  • 3 episodes
  • Arts

Summary

Film critic David Stratton tells the fascinating story of Australian cinema and how the country's film-makers have to helped to shape a nation's idea of itself.

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Episode 3: David Stratton's Stories of Australian Cinema

Summary

How variations on the theme of family are depicted in Australian movie-making The Castle's nuclear, if unorthodox family, a family of faith in The Devil's Playground, Romper Stomper's frightening Neo-Nazis and crime families such as those depicted in Ned Kelly and Animal Kingdom. Last in the series.

Review

The idea of what makes a family is a rich seam for Australian cinema to mine, a reflection of the country’s values and diverse communities. And probably no Aussie film portrays family so perfectly as the 1997 comedy The Castle, which David Stratton admits he didn’t originally get, thinking it was a bit patronising.

While cinema-goers are familiar with Australian films such as Priscilla, Mad Max, Muriel’s Wedding and Picnic at Hanging Rock, the beauty of this series has been that it’s introduced us to – and excited us about - many that, while not so well known outside of Oz, are as important as mainstream ones.

How to watch

Next showing

There are no live broadcasts scheduled for this show.

Details

Formats
Colour

Credits

Crew

rolename
DirectorSally Aitken

All episodes

  • Episode 3

    David Stratton's Stories of Australian Cinema

    Summary

    How variations on the theme of family are depicted in Australian movie-making The Castle's nuclear, if unorthodox family, a family of faith in The Devil's Playground, Romper Stomper's frightening Neo-Nazis and crime families such as those depicted in Ned Kelly and Animal Kingdom. Last in the series.

    Review

    The idea of what makes a family is a rich seam for Australian cinema to mine, a reflection of the country’s values and diverse communities. And probably no Aussie film portrays family so perfectly as the 1997 comedy The Castle, which David Stratton admits he didn’t originally get, thinking it was a bit patronising.

    While cinema-goers are familiar with Australian films such as Priscilla, Mad Max, Muriel’s Wedding and Picnic at Hanging Rock, the beauty of this series has been that it’s introduced us to – and excited us about - many that, while not so well known outside of Oz, are as important as mainstream ones.

    How to watch

    Next showing

    There are no live broadcasts scheduled for this show.

    Details

    Formats
    Colour

    Credits

    Crew

    rolename
    DirectorSally Aitken
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