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David Stratton's Stories of Australian Cinema

  • Season 1
  • 3 episodes
  • Arts

Summary

Film critic David Stratton tells the fascinating story of Australian cinema and how the country's film-makers have to helped to shape a nation's idea of itself.

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Episode 2: David Stratton's Stories of Australian Cinema

Summary

How Australian cinema celebrates the endurance of outsiders, whether they are newcomers to a strange new land in They're a Weird Mob and Wake in Fright, or locals out of step with the mainstream in Evil Angels, Muriel's Wedding and Priscilla, Queen of the Desert.
Recommended

Review

Of all Aussie films, one that really resonates with David Stratton is They’re a Weird Mob because when he arrived in Australia in 1963, the country felt alien to him too. His theme is outsiders so, inevitably, he starts by dissecting that famous Oz-flick Muriel’s Wedding (apparently even Julia Roberts identifies with it).

He also talks – intelligently and with great insight – to Australia’s film community about movies such as the “fearful beauty” of Wake in Fright and A Cry in the Dark (originally Evil Angels). Neither did well at the box office locally because “the mirror they held up to Australia’s behaviour was too raw to stomach”.

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Credits

Crew

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DirectorSally Aitken

All episodes

  • Episode 2

    David Stratton's Stories of Australian Cinema

    Summary

    How Australian cinema celebrates the endurance of outsiders, whether they are newcomers to a strange new land in They're a Weird Mob and Wake in Fright, or locals out of step with the mainstream in Evil Angels, Muriel's Wedding and Priscilla, Queen of the Desert.
    Recommended

    Review

    Of all Aussie films, one that really resonates with David Stratton is They’re a Weird Mob because when he arrived in Australia in 1963, the country felt alien to him too. His theme is outsiders so, inevitably, he starts by dissecting that famous Oz-flick Muriel’s Wedding (apparently even Julia Roberts identifies with it).

    He also talks – intelligently and with great insight – to Australia’s film community about movies such as the “fearful beauty” of Wake in Fright and A Cry in the Dark (originally Evil Angels). Neither did well at the box office locally because “the mirror they held up to Australia’s behaviour was too raw to stomach”.

    How to watch

    Loading

    Details

    Formats
    Colour

    Credits

    Crew

    rolename
    DirectorSally Aitken
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