The Queen Mum: The Lost Year

The Queen Mum: The Lost Year

Series 1

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Review

Cecil Beaton described the Queen Mother as “marshmallow made on a welding machine” and we get some idea of what he meant here. On the one hand, she was a smiley grandmother to the nation, but on the other, a steely traditionalist who put a stop to Princess Margaret’s relationship with Peter Townsend.

So it won’t be surprising to hear that your own views may fluctuate over the course of this concluding hour. There’s real sympathy to be had when she loses both her husband and her role as queen. But it’s hard to empathise when she gets the hump after moving into Clarence House and describes it as “small and horrid”. I mean, it’s hardly a mouldy studio flat.

Summary

Part two of two. The concluding part of the documentary looks into the difficult time faced by the queen mother following her husband George VI's death in February 1952. From this crisis year, which like 1936 had begun with death and disaster, she again emerged stronger and more determined to reclaim her position as a powerful matriarch in charge of the Windsor dynasty. She became queen-maker to her daughter Elizabeth, guardian of the traditional Windsor dynasty flame, and fiercely protective grandmother to the heir apparent, Prince Charles.

Cast & Crew

Director Kate Misrahi
Executive Producer Denys Blakeway
Producer Kate Misrahi
Documentary