The Radio Times logo

Life in the Air

  • 2016
  • Season 1
  • 3 episodes
  • Nature

Summary

Experience the hidden world of jumping, gliding and flying creatures like never before.

Advertisement

Episode 3: Crowded Skies

Summary

The final episode of the series features footage shot from within a giant flock of birds, revealing how half a million of them can fly in a group without colliding with each other. The programme also showcases the world's fastest airborne courtship display, a bird that savagely defends its territory, and conflict between moths and bats in the South American jungle.
Recommended

Review

Rating: 3 out of 5.

Some of the creatures in this series are easy on the eye – the implausibly flash spatula-tailed hummingbird we meet tonight, for instance, which has tail-feathers Elton John might consider a bit much.

But it’s often at the other end of the scale that we find the fascinating stuff – unglamorous creatures like the kingbirds. They look ordinary, neither big nor colourful, but are brilliantly aggressive. We see one laying into a raven many times his size to chase the latter from his nest and you have to admire the kingbird’s spirit. Even less prepossessing is the tiny phorid fly: she lays her eggs in fire ants so the larva can eat its host from the inside.

How to watch

Loading

Streaming

Details

Formats
Colour

Credits

Cast

rolename
PresenterSuranne Jones

Crew

rolename
Series producerJames Brickell

All episodes

  • Episode 3

    Crowded Skies

    Summary

    The final episode of the series features footage shot from within a giant flock of birds, revealing how half a million of them can fly in a group without colliding with each other. The programme also showcases the world's fastest airborne courtship display, a bird that savagely defends its territory, and conflict between moths and bats in the South American jungle.
    Recommended

    Review

    Rating: 3 out of 5.

    Some of the creatures in this series are easy on the eye – the implausibly flash spatula-tailed hummingbird we meet tonight, for instance, which has tail-feathers Elton John might consider a bit much.

    But it’s often at the other end of the scale that we find the fascinating stuff – unglamorous creatures like the kingbirds. They look ordinary, neither big nor colourful, but are brilliantly aggressive. We see one laying into a raven many times his size to chase the latter from his nest and you have to admire the kingbird’s spirit. Even less prepossessing is the tiny phorid fly: she lays her eggs in fire ants so the larva can eat its host from the inside.

    How to watch

    Loading

    Streaming

    Details

    Formats
    Colour

    Credits

    Cast

    rolename
    PresenterSuranne Jones

    Crew

    rolename
    Series producerJames Brickell
Advertisement

RadioTimes.com is getting better. Fresh new look, redesigned programme hub, richer content…

FIND OUT MORE
Advertisement

Sponsored content