The Radio Times logo

A Very British Murder with Lucy Worsley

  • Season 1
  • 3 episodes
  • Education
Advertisement

Episode 3: The Golden Age

Summary

The historian tells the story of one of the first high-profile killers - Dr Crippen, who was hanged in 1910 for poisoning and dismembering his wife - before turning her attention to the interwar period, when detective fiction reached the peak of its popularity at the hands of authors Agatha Christie and Dorothy L Sayers. After undergoing the elaborate initiation ceremony of the Detection Club, which was set up by a group of British writers in 1930, Lucy considers how Alfred Hitchcock's films and Graham Greene's books eclipsed the traditional murder-mystery story in the depiction of homicide. Last in the series.
Recommended

Review

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Lucy Worsley is always effervescent, but when discussing her favourite author of detective fiction, Dorothy L Sayers, she bubbles like an overheating foot spa. “She’s my absolute favourite,” says Worsley, “she had a very big brain.” Worsley’s favourite Sayers novel is Gaudy Night, thanks largely to its gutsy protagonist, the feminist Harriet Vane, who was to become the wife of Sayers’ great detective creation, Lord Peter Wimsey.

Worsley is the perfect guide through the bloodied hallways of murder scenes, both real (tonight Dr Crippen) and fictional. She strikes just the right tone; yes, she might be as jolly as a young gel who’s just won a lacrosse match, but she’s not frivolous. Murder, after all, is a serious business, as she discusses with the peerless PD James.

How to watch

Loading

Streaming

Details

Formats
Colour

Credits

Cast

rolename
PresenterLucy Worsley

Crew

rolename
DirectorMatthew Thomas
Executive producerMichael Poole
ProducerMatthew Thomas
Series producerAlastair Laurence

All episodes

  • Episode 3

    The Golden Age

    Summary

    The historian tells the story of one of the first high-profile killers - Dr Crippen, who was hanged in 1910 for poisoning and dismembering his wife - before turning her attention to the interwar period, when detective fiction reached the peak of its popularity at the hands of authors Agatha Christie and Dorothy L Sayers. After undergoing the elaborate initiation ceremony of the Detection Club, which was set up by a group of British writers in 1930, Lucy considers how Alfred Hitchcock's films and Graham Greene's books eclipsed the traditional murder-mystery story in the depiction of homicide. Last in the series.
    Recommended

    Review

    Rating: 4 out of 5.

    Lucy Worsley is always effervescent, but when discussing her favourite author of detective fiction, Dorothy L Sayers, she bubbles like an overheating foot spa. “She’s my absolute favourite,” says Worsley, “she had a very big brain.” Worsley’s favourite Sayers novel is Gaudy Night, thanks largely to its gutsy protagonist, the feminist Harriet Vane, who was to become the wife of Sayers’ great detective creation, Lord Peter Wimsey.

    Worsley is the perfect guide through the bloodied hallways of murder scenes, both real (tonight Dr Crippen) and fictional. She strikes just the right tone; yes, she might be as jolly as a young gel who’s just won a lacrosse match, but she’s not frivolous. Murder, after all, is a serious business, as she discusses with the peerless PD James.

    How to watch

    Loading

    Streaming

    Details

    Formats
    Colour

    Credits

    Cast

    rolename
    PresenterLucy Worsley

    Crew

    rolename
    DirectorMatthew Thomas
    Executive producerMichael Poole
    ProducerMatthew Thomas
    Series producerAlastair Laurence
Advertisement

RadioTimes.com is getting better. Fresh new look, redesigned programme hub, richer content…

FIND OUT MORE
Advertisement

Sponsored content