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Digging Up Britain's Past

  • 2018
  • Season 1
  • 6 episodes
  • Documentary and factual
  • History

Summary

Archaeology series exploring fascinating periods in British history.

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Episode 3: Stonehenge

Summary

Helen Skelton and Alex Langlands explore the history of Stonehenge, examining the stones that make up the structure, their acoustic properties, and how they were transported 120 miles from their origins in Salisbury Plain to form the circle. Helen also visits a village where builders were believed to have lived during the site's construction and meets scientists who have analysed the bodies buried beneath the monument, including the remains of a man who is believed to have come to Stonehenge all the way from Switzerland

Review

The archaeology series turns up at Stonehenge to sift through the subsoil of new research. As so often with programmes about the monument, the overall effect is tantalising. Clearly something extraordinary was happening in southern Britain 4,000 years ago: the evidence points to a trading culture and Salisbury plain as a focus and gathering point for people from across Europe. But what that society looked like and how it worked is more than you can glean from the odd arrowhead.

Still, there are intriguing titbits as we learn about the magic of bluestone and the importance of flint mines – the latter at an amazing site in Norfolk where the shafts were dug with antlers.

How to watch

Next showing

There are no live broadcasts scheduled for this show. But it is available via the streaming providers below.

Streaming

We may earn commission from links on this page. Our editorial is always independent (learn more)

Details

Languages
Formats
Colour

Credits

Crew

rolename
PresenterHelen Skelton
PresenterAlex Langlands
Series producerDavid Caldwell-Evans

All episodes

  • Summary

    Helen Skelton and Alex Langlands explore the history of Stonehenge, examining the stones that make up the structure, their acoustic properties, and how they were transported 120 miles from their origins in Salisbury Plain to form the circle. Helen also visits a village where builders were believed to have lived during the site's construction and meets scientists who have analysed the bodies buried beneath the monument, including the remains of a man who is believed to have come to Stonehenge all the way from Switzerland

    Review

    The archaeology series turns up at Stonehenge to sift through the subsoil of new research. As so often with programmes about the monument, the overall effect is tantalising. Clearly something extraordinary was happening in southern Britain 4,000 years ago: the evidence points to a trading culture and Salisbury plain as a focus and gathering point for people from across Europe. But what that society looked like and how it worked is more than you can glean from the odd arrowhead.

    Still, there are intriguing titbits as we learn about the magic of bluestone and the importance of flint mines – the latter at an amazing site in Norfolk where the shafts were dug with antlers.

    How to watch

    Next showing

    There are no live broadcasts scheduled for this show. But it is available via the streaming providers below.

    Streaming

    We may earn commission from links on this page. Our editorial is always independent (learn more)

    Details

    Languages
    Formats
    Colour

    Credits

    Crew

    rolename
    PresenterHelen Skelton
    PresenterAlex Langlands
    Series producerDavid Caldwell-Evans

How to watch

Next showing

There are no live broadcasts scheduled for this show. But it is available via the streaming providers below.

Streaming

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