The Radio Times logo

Country Music

  • 2019
  • Season 1
  • 8 episodes
  • Music
  • Documentary and factual

Summary

Ken Burns’s eight-part, 16-hour documentary series, COUNTRY MUSIC, chronicles the history of a uniquely American art form, focusing on the biographies of the fascinating characters who created it. The film follows the evolution of country music from its diverse and humble origins as it emerged, by the end of the twentieth century, into a worldwide phenomenon.

Advertisement

Episode 5: The Sons and Daughters of America (1964-1968)

Summary

The history of the art form and how it evolved between 1964 and 1968. During a time of cultural upheaval, country music reflected a changing America, as Loretta Lynn addresseed women's concerns, Merle Haggard championed the common man, and audiences looked beyond skin colour to embrace Charley Pride. Meanwhile, Johnny Cash descended into the chaos of drug addiction, though The Man in Black found salvation through the intervention of June Carter and a landmark album that critics still applaud. Narrated by Peter Coyote

Review

Sixties America was a turbulent decade of changing attitudes and civil struggles, which country music perfectly reflected. Loretta Lynn sang about controversial women’s issues while Charley Pride recalls the audience’s shock over a black country singer at the Grand Ole Opry.

But it was “Hollywood handsome” Merle Haggard who best represented the common man. An “Okie” and a “graduate of San Quentin” he knew what it was like to be dirt poor.
Meanwhile, we see Johnny Cash destroying himself with drugs (as well as duetting with a young Bob Dylan).

Part two of Ken Burns’s terrific and instructive series covers the early 70s, taking us through the rise of Mr and Mrs Country Music (Tammy Wynette and George Jones) and Kris Kristofferson, a shy janitor who became one of Nashville’s finest lyric writers and biggest stars.

Details

Languages
English
Formats
Colour

Credits

Crew

rolename
NarratorPeter Coyote
UnknownLoretta Lynn
UnknownWillie Nelson
UnknownRosanne Cash
UnknownElvis Costello
UnknownBrenda Lee
UnknownMerle Haggard
DirectorKen Burns

All episodes

  • Episode 5

    The Sons and Daughters of America (1964-1968)

    Summary

    The history of the art form and how it evolved between 1964 and 1968. During a time of cultural upheaval, country music reflected a changing America, as Loretta Lynn addresseed women's concerns, Merle Haggard championed the common man, and audiences looked beyond skin colour to embrace Charley Pride. Meanwhile, Johnny Cash descended into the chaos of drug addiction, though The Man in Black found salvation through the intervention of June Carter and a landmark album that critics still applaud. Narrated by Peter Coyote

    Review

    Sixties America was a turbulent decade of changing attitudes and civil struggles, which country music perfectly reflected. Loretta Lynn sang about controversial women’s issues while Charley Pride recalls the audience’s shock over a black country singer at the Grand Ole Opry.

    But it was “Hollywood handsome” Merle Haggard who best represented the common man. An “Okie” and a “graduate of San Quentin” he knew what it was like to be dirt poor.
    Meanwhile, we see Johnny Cash destroying himself with drugs (as well as duetting with a young Bob Dylan).

    Part two of Ken Burns’s terrific and instructive series covers the early 70s, taking us through the rise of Mr and Mrs Country Music (Tammy Wynette and George Jones) and Kris Kristofferson, a shy janitor who became one of Nashville’s finest lyric writers and biggest stars.

    Details

    Languages
    English
    Formats
    Colour

    Credits

    Crew

    rolename
    NarratorPeter Coyote
    UnknownLoretta Lynn
    UnknownWillie Nelson
    UnknownRosanne Cash
    UnknownElvis Costello
    UnknownBrenda Lee
    UnknownMerle Haggard
    DirectorKen Burns
Powered By
IMDB

How to watch

Next showing

There are no live broadcasts scheduled for this show. But it is available via the streaming provider below.

Streaming

Advertisement

RadioTimes.com is getting better. Fresh new look, redesigned programme hub, richer content…

FIND OUT MORE
Advertisement

Sponsored content