Peaky Blinders series 5 will be set during the 1929 financial crash – is Thomas Shelby’s fortune under threat?

The show moves to BBC1 with everyone facing "opportunity and misfortune" caused by global financial meltdown

Peaky Blinders s5 BBC publicity pic, BD

The Peaky Blinders could have a rather different enemy to contend with in series five – the financial disaster wrought by the 1929 Wall Street crash.

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Filming on the new series has just begun, and the BBC has hinted that the Brummie wrong’uns done good will see their world thrown into turmoil by the global depression.

“Opportunity and misfortune are everywhere,” the producers say of the new series, which moves to BBC1 for the first time.

“When Tommy Shelby MP (Cillian Murphy) is approached by a charismatic politician with a bold vision for Britain, he realises that his response will affect not just his family’s future but that of the entire nation.”

The above image shows the first picture of Murphy from the new series, which is written once again by Steven Knight.

“The story of the Peaky Blinders and of the Shelby family gets woven into the political fabric of Britain and Europe as the 1920s end and the 30s begin,” Knight said. “Tommy Shelby faces the darkest force he has ever faced and his struggle is as relevant today as it was then.”

Also returning to the series are Helen McCrory as Polly, Paul Anderson as Arthur Shelby Jr, and Sophie Rundle as Ada Shelby.

Other returning regulars include Finn Cole (Michael Gray), Kate Phillips (Linda Shelby) and Natasha O’Keefe (Lizzie Stark).

Aidan Gillen (Game of Thrones) and Jack Rowan (Born To Kill) will also be back as father and son heavyweights Aberama and Bonnie Gold.

Series five also sees the return of other Peaky regulars Charlie Murphy (Happy Valley), Kingsley Ben-Adir (Deep State), Harry Kirton (We Can Be Heroes), Packy Lee (The Frankenstein Chronicles), Ned Dennehy (Good Omens), Ian Peck (Endeavour) and poet/musician Benjamin Zephaniah.

Peaky Blinders series 5 is due to air on BBC1 in early 2019

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This article was originally published on 4 October 2018