Win a year at the theatre – your chance to judge the Olivier Awards 2021

We'll be picking a panellist to help judge the awards and giving them two free tickets for all new West End productions in the running

LONDON, ENGLAND - APRIL 09:  Sir Kenneth Branagh with his Special Award on stage during The Olivier Awards 2017 at Royal Albert Hall on April 9, 2017 in London, England.  (Photo by Jeff Spicer/Getty Images)

Starting from 19 February 2020, one Radio Times reader can join the Olivier Awards judging panel and receive two free tickets (the best available) and a programme for all new West End productions in the running for an award (excluding opera or dance).

How to enter

Write a 150-word review of a theatre production that you’ve seen in the past year. Send it to us with an additional 200 words telling us a bit about yourself and why you deserve to be on the panel, and a list of all the shows you’ve seen in the past 12 months.

Post your entry, name, address, email and phone number to Oliviers Competition, Radio Times, Vineyard House,
44 Brook Green,London W6 7BT.

Or email it to feedback@radiotimes.com with “Oliviers Competition” in the subject line.

Closing date is 13 December 2019

How it works

Four readers will be shortlisted by Radio Times and invited to London on 13, 14, 15 or 16 January 2020 for a brief interview at the Society of London Theatre (SOLT). One winner will then be selected by SOLT to join the theatre panel.

The winner will be expected to commit to watching all proposed productions (about 100 over the year) and be invited to attend the awards ceremony at a central London venue in April 2021. Apart from tickets
and programmes, the winner will not be reimbursed by SOLT or RT for any expenses incurred. Competition rules on page 149.

Radio Times’s current judge says…

Samuel Miles: “My year so far has been a whirlwind. I’ve seen plays I loved; plays I hated; plays I thought I would love but didn’t; and plays I thought I would hate but actually loved.

“Being an Oliviers judge is completely unlike my day job as a social science researcher, but surprisingly I’m nding it teaches me a lot about how performance and theatre re ect who we are as a society and what themes and tensions are in people’s minds in this uncertain political climate. Even plays written hundreds of years ago are given a strikingly contemporary edge — like Henry V at the Globe, which blew me away.

“I watch a minimum of two shows a week, every week — it’s an amazing privilege but also a real commitment. All the same, it’s great to be able to invite friends to the newest show
in the West End, tickets on me.

“I would recommend applying to be an Oliviers judge to anyone who enjoys theatre. You don’t have to be an expert, you just have to think about how performances make you feel, what they communicate and how they go about it. This is your chance!”

Advertisement