Could Fiona Bruce be the new host of Question Time?

The BBC News at Six presenter could be the first female host of the leading politics programme

Fiona Bruce

Fiona Bruce is ‘in talks’ to take over the role of Question Time host, it has been reported.

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The veteran broadcaster, 54, would be taking the reins from Question Time mainstay David Dimbleby, after he leaves the show in December.

Should she take the role, Bruce would become the show’s first full-time female host in the show’s 40-year history.

Question Time (BBC, EH)
Question Time (BBC, EH)

It is understood Bruce was auditioned for the role among several other candidates for the coveted position, with Emily Maitlis, Jeremy Paxman and Victoria Derbyshire additionally being considered.

A correspondent for the Corporation told BBC News that they were keen to have an established figure who had previous experience on BBC One.

BBC media editor Amol Rajan said negotiations with Bruce were ‘continuing’, and would not comment on speculation.

Bruce launched her television career in 1989 when she started work as a researcher for BBC’s Panorama. After becoming assistant producer for the show, she swapped to reporting in 1992.

In 1999, she was named as secondary presenter for the BBC Six O’Clock News, a role she has recently returned to as a relief presenter in more recent years.

Presenters Fiona Bruce, Philip Mould with ‘Glass Jug with Plates and Pears’ by William Nicholson (BBC, TL)
Presenters Fiona Bruce, Philip Mould with ‘Glass Jug with Plates and Pears’ by William Nicholson (BBC, TL)

As well as news presenting, Bruce has firmly established herself as an entertainment and arts presenter, having fronted Antiques Roadshow as its lead presenter since 2008 as well as co-hosting BBC’s Fake or Fortune?, which observes the authenticity of works of art.

She has also presented BBC Four quiz programme Hive Minds.

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Meanwhile, Dimbleby has hosted Question Time since 1994. The show, which is filmed in a different UK city every week, has been a magnet for controversy in more recent years, often encouraging fierce political debate on Twitter.


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