Latest movies: Aftermath, The Boss Baby, Going in Style, Mad to Be Normal

A plane crash brings out a new side to Arnie, a big baby gets bossy and David Tennant returns as a Scottish doctor

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AFTERMATH ★★★

Audiences expecting a revenge rampage from Schwarzenegger might be surprised to find him in a career-redefining role as a bereaved family man stricken by grief. Based on a true story, the movie has Arnie playing a builder who blames Scoot McNairy’s guilt-ridden air traffic controller for the death of his wife and daughter. When the two men meet it makes for an explosive climax, despite any actual explosions.

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THE BOSS BABY ★★★

The sudden arrival of a sibling can only spell trouble for Tim, an imaginative seven-year-old who gets all the attention in this animated comedy from the director of Madagascar. It certainly doesn’t help that his new brother is a white collar whizzkid (voiced by Alec Baldwin) with a business suit instead of a diaper. Depicting a spoilt child with a corporate agenda might be a touch satirical for this Easter’s big family movie, but The Boss Baby can stand on its own with the jokes alone.


GOING IN STYLE ★★★

Legends of cinema Michael Caine, Morgan Freeman and Alan Alda slap on the Deep Heat and limber up for an audacious bank robbery in a caper from director (and sometime actor) Zach Braff. Don’t expect a fast getaway, more a leisurely ride with a bit of banter and some gentle (very gentle) slapstick. By the way, real-life geriatric heist movie The Hatton Garden Job is in cinemas next week.


CITY OF TINY LIGHTS ★★★

Riz Ahmed is a chain-smoking, bourbon-slugging PI with a troubled past in this British crime drama that artfully transposes the trappings of the noir genre onto contemporary London, a place depicted as caught in the tensions of gentrification and terrorism. It’s a slick, moody flick with a surprise appearance from Billie Piper as an old flame.

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MAD TO BE NORMAL ★★★

How do you make a mainstream movie about a counterculture psychiatrist who blamed mental illness on society and experimented with LSD? Director Robert Mullen’s answer is David Tennant, a man instantly recognizable as a doctor, albeit of a very different kind. Here he plays 60s maverick RD Laing, a role that lets Tennant dip into his native Scottish accent for once. It’s a period piece about a fascinating figure, presented here as a man defined by visionary ideas, ego and loud shirts.


ALSO RELEASED THIS WEEK

A DARK SONG ★★★

I AM NOT YOUR NEGRO ★★★★

NERUDA ★★★★★

A QUIET PASSION ★★★

RAW ★★★★

TABLE 19 ★★★


 Order your copy of the Radio Times Guide to Films 2017