10 questions that Doctor Who fans need answered right now

Why can't the Doctor visit Amy and Rory in '60s Manhattan? How does River Song know the Doctor's name? And just what happened to the Doctor's daughter? We count down the big questions, and see if there really is an answer for them after all…

9. Why have we never seen the Reapers from Father’s Day again? 

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In 2005’s Father’s Day, it is established for New Who viewers that time paradoxes are a Very Bad Thing, with Rose’s abuse of time travel to stop the death of her father causing the appearance of Reapers: creatures that – in the absence of the Time Lords – sterilise wounds in time by consuming everyone within them. In that episode, the day is won when Rose’s father fixes the paradox by sacrificing himself to save everyone, but the question remains: why haven’t we seen the Reapers since? Surely since 2005 there have been enough instances of time paradoxes – A Christmas Carol, The Waters of Mars, The Wedding of River Song – to justify the creatures’ intervention? So, where the hell are they? 

Is there an answer?

No. Or, at least, not an official one. Fans, however, have contorted themselves into an array of intricate knots to reason why they have not appeared again. The reason they didn’t appear in The Waters of Mars, for instance, is because there wasn’t enough time for them to manifest and Adelaide fixed the paradox my committing suicide anyway; in The Wedding of River Song, the paradox was far too big for them to consume; and as for The Day / Time of the Doctor, the Time Lords were present to keep the paradox in check. There’s also the theory that the  pile-up of paradoxes are yet to happen in the exact same way as they did in Father’s Day, so that’s why there hasn’t been a repeat of its events. 

Or, of course, it could just be that they’re a bit of a rubbish, script-killing concept and Doctor Who decided to ditch them. 

8. Is Jack Harkness really the Face of Boe? 

In 2005 episode The End of the World, we first meet the Face of Boe: a 5 billion year-old big head in a jar, who is apparently the last of “Boekind”. Following an appearance in 2006’s New Earth, he finally dies of old age in 2007’s Gridlock. But, apparently, those are not the only times we’ve seen Boe – albeit, with a slightly smaller face. For in Last of the Time Lords, Captain Jack Harkness, Doctor Who’s resident omnisexual immortal, worries how he’ll look if he lives for millions of years right before revealing that because he was the first person from the Boeshane Peninsula to join the Time Agency, he was featured on posters – earning him the nickname “the Face of Boe”. So, does this mean what fans thinks it means…? 

Is there an answer?

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Not really, no. Russell T Davies has been very keen to keep the whole thing as ambiguous as possible, stating that, “the moment it [becomes] very true or very false, the joke dies”. He has also refused the publication of any spin-off novels or comic books that have tried to definitively link the two. Sorry, Who fans, it just looks like we’ll never know.