One in four eat Christmas dinner with the television on

And 60 per cent don’t tune in for the Queen’s speech according to an exclusive RadioTimes.com poll

imagenotavailable1

Forget the smartphone, the iPad and the games console – there’s still only one media device that really matters at Christmas: the television. Indeed, such is our passion for TV that one in four of us won’t even be switching it off during Christmas dinner this year, according to an exclusive RadioTimes.com poll.

Advertisement

But maybe it’s because so many people are doing their patriotic duty and tuning in for the Queen’s speech to the Commonwealth while chomping on their turkey? Think again – in fact, 60 per cent of those polled said they don’t watch the Queen’s speech. This suggests fewer people are planning to tune in for the annual message this year than last, when nearly nine million viewers watched on BBC1 and ITV1 – around 50 per cent of all those watching television at that time.

The poll of over 2,000 RadioTimes.com users also revealed that almost half of people think that Christmas television is worse today than it was when they were a child, with 35 per cent saying it’s no different, and only 18 per cent agreeing that yuletide telly is better now.

However, whether or not Downton Abbey and Doctor Who measure up to Morecambe and Wise and The Great Escape, over 60 per cent of respondents still said the television was the one media device they could not do without on Christmas Day.

Radio, in comparison, didn’t fare as well, with more people saying they couldn’t live without their mobile phone (11.4 per cent) and their laptop (9.8 per cent) than the wireless – which just 9.2 per cent valued most highly.

Advertisement

Yes, the TV remains at the heart of Christmas for the majority, it seems. More than a third of respondents said that they switch on the telly before 10am and almost two thirds of people admit to watching at least three hours or more of television on Christmas Day, with nearly seven per cent admitting they put in a full working day in front of the box on 25 December, watching eight hours or more of television.