Can you pick the winner of the Grand National?

Of course you can, with the help of our handy Grand National-by-Numbers gambling guide

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Before placing your once-a-year bet, look at the statistics below and you’ll see, historically, what makes a winner. And what’s not worth backing at all…

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The name game
Only six winners in the past 50 years have included a human element in their name – the last being Monty’s Pass in 2003. Despite this poor return, bookmakers William Hill claim that these horses are always some of the most heavily backed.

The number five
The number ten

M is the next most successful initial letter with five winners in the same period.

The number two
The number nine
The number 12

But with five winners each in the past 50 years, 14-1 and 28-1 are the most successful odds. There have been four winners at 7-1 in the same period.

The number six

Jockey Richard Dunwoody, who won on second favourite West Tip in 1986, blames the fences. “This will be the first time many of the horses have seen fences this big and it can be a daunting prospect, even for a well-fancied horse. It’s also the longest race of the year, which can take its toll on the favourites.”

The number 22
The number 12

“If you’ve bred a nice mare you’d race her on the flat,” explains Clare Balding. “You wouldn’t teach her to jump and risk getting injured because mares have a breeding value so they nearly always get sent to stud instead.”

Before placing your once-a-year bet, look at the statistics below and you’ll see, historically, what makes a winner. And what’s not worth backing at all…

The name game
Only six winners in the past 50 years have included a human element in their name – the last being Monty’s Pass in 2003. Despite this poor return, bookmakers William Hill claim that these horses are always some of the most heavily backed.

Go green
Five of the past ten Grand National winning jockeys have had green as part of their racing colours, making it the luckiest tint.

The number ten

M is the next most successful initial letter with five winners in the same period.

The number two
The number nine
The number 12

But with five winners each in the past 50 years, 14-1 and 28-1 are the most successful odds. There have been four winners at 7-1 in the same period.

The number six

Jockey Richard Dunwoody, who won on second favourite West Tip in 1986, blames the fences. “This will be the first time many of the horses have seen fences this big and it can be a daunting prospect, even for a well-fancied horse. It’s also the longest race of the year, which can take its toll on the favourites.”

The number 22
The number 12

“If you’ve bred a nice mare you’d race her on the flat,” explains Clare Balding. “You wouldn’t teach her to jump and risk getting injured because mares have a breeding value so they nearly always get sent to stud instead.”

Before placing your once-a-year bet, look at the statistics below and you’ll see, historically, what makes a winner. And what’s not worth backing at all…

The name game
Only six winners in the past 50 years have included a human element in their name – the last being Monty’s Pass in 2003. Despite this poor return, bookmakers William Hill claim that these horses are always some of the most heavily backed.

Go green
Five of the past ten Grand National winning jockeys have had green as part of their racing colours, making it the luckiest tint.

Rrraring to go
Ten of the past 50 winning horses have had names that begin with R – including Rag Trade, Royal Athlete and the legendary Red Rum.

M is the next most successful initial letter with five winners in the same period.

The number two
The number nine
The number 12

But with five winners each in the past 50 years, 14-1 and 28-1 are the most successful odds. There have been four winners at 7-1 in the same period.

The number six

Jockey Richard Dunwoody, who won on second favourite West Tip in 1986, blames the fences. “This will be the first time many of the horses have seen fences this big and it can be a daunting prospect, even for a well-fancied horse. It’s also the longest race of the year, which can take its toll on the favourites.”

The number 22
The number 12

“If you’ve bred a nice mare you’d race her on the flat,” explains Clare Balding. “You wouldn’t teach her to jump and risk getting injured because mares have a breeding value so they nearly always get sent to stud instead.”

Before placing your once-a-year bet, look at the statistics below and you’ll see, historically, what makes a winner. And what’s not worth backing at all…

The name game
Only six winners in the past 50 years have included a human element in their name – the last being Monty’s Pass in 2003. Despite this poor return, bookmakers William Hill claim that these horses are always some of the most heavily backed.

Go green
Five of the past ten Grand National winning jockeys have had green as part of their racing colours, making it the luckiest tint.

Rrraring to go
Ten of the past 50 winning horses have had names that begin with R – including Rag Trade, Royal Athlete and the legendary Red Rum.

M is the next most successful initial letter with five winners in the same period.

The long view
Only two 100-1 shots have finished in the top four since 1980.

The number nine
The number 12

But with five winners each in the past 50 years, 14-1 and 28-1 are the most successful odds. There have been four winners at 7-1 in the same period.

The number six

Jockey Richard Dunwoody, who won on second favourite West Tip in 1986, blames the fences. “This will be the first time many of the horses have seen fences this big and it can be a daunting prospect, even for a well-fancied horse. It’s also the longest race of the year, which can take its toll on the favourites.”

The number 22
The number 12

“If you’ve bred a nice mare you’d race her on the flat,” explains Clare Balding. “You wouldn’t teach her to jump and risk getting injured because mares have a breeding value so they nearly always get sent to stud instead.”

Before placing your once-a-year bet, look at the statistics below and you’ll see, historically, what makes a winner. And what’s not worth backing at all…

The name game
Only six winners in the past 50 years have included a human element in their name – the last being Monty’s Pass in 2003. Despite this poor return, bookmakers William Hill claim that these horses are always some of the most heavily backed.

Go green
Five of the past ten Grand National winning jockeys have had green as part of their racing colours, making it the luckiest tint.

Rrraring to go
Ten of the past 50 winning horses have had names that begin with R – including Rag Trade, Royal Athlete and the legendary Red Rum.

M is the next most successful initial letter with five winners in the same period.

The long view
Only two 100-1 shots have finished in the top four since 1980.

How old?
The optimum age for a horse in this race is nine. Since 1900, a nine-year-old has won 35 times. “Nine-year-olds are at the age where they’re strong and experienced enough without being over the hill,” explains Clare Balding, who’s presenting BBC1’s coverage. “They’re still improving so they can stay ahead of the handicap system, but they’ve got the maturity to win.”

The number 12

But with five winners each in the past 50 years, 14-1 and 28-1 are the most successful odds. There have been four winners at 7-1 in the same period.

The number six

Jockey Richard Dunwoody, who won on second favourite West Tip in 1986, blames the fences. “This will be the first time many of the horses have seen fences this big and it can be a daunting prospect, even for a well-fancied horse. It’s also the longest race of the year, which can take its toll on the favourites.”

The number 22
The number 12

“If you’ve bred a nice mare you’d race her on the flat,” explains Clare Balding. “You wouldn’t teach her to jump and risk getting injured because mares have a breeding value so they nearly always get sent to stud instead.”

Before placing your once-a-year bet, look at the statistics below and you’ll see, historically, what makes a winner. And what’s not worth backing at all…

The name game
Only six winners in the past 50 years have included a human element in their name – the last being Monty’s Pass in 2003. Despite this poor return, bookmakers William Hill claim that these horses are always some of the most heavily backed.

Go green
Five of the past ten Grand National winning jockeys have had green as part of their racing colours, making it the luckiest tint.

Rrraring to go
Ten of the past 50 winning horses have had names that begin with R – including Rag Trade, Royal Athlete and the legendary Red Rum.

M is the next most successful initial letter with five winners in the same period.

The long view
Only two 100-1 shots have finished in the top four since 1980.

How old?
The optimum age for a horse in this race is nine. Since 1900, a nine-year-old has won 35 times. “Nine-year-olds are at the age where they’re strong and experienced enough without being over the hill,” explains Clare Balding, who’s presenting BBC1’s coverage. “They’re still improving so they can stay ahead of the handicap system, but they’ve got the maturity to win.”

The right odds
Bookmakers William Hill claim that, taken as an average of the previous 50 winners, 12-1 are the right odds when looking to back a winner.

But with five winners each in the past 50 years, 14-1 and 28-1 are the most successful odds. There have been four winners at 7-1 in the same period.

The number six

Jockey Richard Dunwoody, who won on second favourite West Tip in 1986, blames the fences. “This will be the first time many of the horses have seen fences this big and it can be a daunting prospect, even for a well-fancied horse. It’s also the longest race of the year, which can take its toll on the favourites.”

The number 22
The number 12

“If you’ve bred a nice mare you’d race her on the flat,” explains Clare Balding. “You wouldn’t teach her to jump and risk getting injured because mares have a breeding value so they nearly always get sent to stud instead.”

Before placing your once-a-year bet, look at the statistics below and you’ll see, historically, what makes a winner. And what’s not worth backing at all…

The name game
Only six winners in the past 50 years have included a human element in their name – the last being Monty’s Pass in 2003. Despite this poor return, bookmakers William Hill claim that these horses are always some of the most heavily backed.

Go green
Five of the past ten Grand National winning jockeys have had green as part of their racing colours, making it the luckiest tint.

Rrraring to go
Ten of the past 50 winning horses have had names that begin with R – including Rag Trade, Royal Athlete and the legendary Red Rum.

M is the next most successful initial letter with five winners in the same period.

The long view
Only two 100-1 shots have finished in the top four since 1980.

How old?
The optimum age for a horse in this race is nine. Since 1900, a nine-year-old has won 35 times. “Nine-year-olds are at the age where they’re strong and experienced enough without being over the hill,” explains Clare Balding, who’s presenting BBC1’s coverage. “They’re still improving so they can stay ahead of the handicap system, but they’ve got the maturity to win.”

The right odds
Bookmakers William Hill claim that, taken as an average of the previous 50 winners, 12-1 are the right odds when looking to back a winner.

But with five winners each in the past 50 years, 14-1 and 28-1 are the most successful odds. There have been four winners at 7-1 in the same period.

Top trumps
Only six of the past 50 favourites have won.

Jockey Richard Dunwoody, who won on second favourite West Tip in 1986, blames the fences. “This will be the first time many of the horses have seen fences this big and it can be a daunting prospect, even for a well-fancied horse. It’s also the longest race of the year, which can take its toll on the favourites.”

The number 22
The number 12

“If you’ve bred a nice mare you’d race her on the flat,” explains Clare Balding. “You wouldn’t teach her to jump and risk getting injured because mares have a breeding value so they nearly always get sent to stud instead.”

Before placing your once-a-year bet, look at the statistics below and you’ll see, historically, what makes a winner. And what’s not worth backing at all…

The name game
Only six winners in the past 50 years have included a human element in their name – the last being Monty’s Pass in 2003. Despite this poor return, bookmakers William Hill claim that these horses are always some of the most heavily backed.

Go green
Five of the past ten Grand National winning jockeys have had green as part of their racing colours, making it the luckiest tint.

Rrraring to go
Ten of the past 50 winning horses have had names that begin with R – including Rag Trade, Royal Athlete and the legendary Red Rum.

M is the next most successful initial letter with five winners in the same period.

The long view
Only two 100-1 shots have finished in the top four since 1980.

How old?
The optimum age for a horse in this race is nine. Since 1900, a nine-year-old has won 35 times. “Nine-year-olds are at the age where they’re strong and experienced enough without being over the hill,” explains Clare Balding, who’s presenting BBC1’s coverage. “They’re still improving so they can stay ahead of the handicap system, but they’ve got the maturity to win.”

The right odds
Bookmakers William Hill claim that, taken as an average of the previous 50 winners, 12-1 are the right odds when looking to back a winner.

But with five winners each in the past 50 years, 14-1 and 28-1 are the most successful odds. There have been four winners at 7-1 in the same period.

Top trumps
Only six of the past 50 favourites have won.

Jockey Richard Dunwoody, who won on second favourite West Tip in 1986, blames the fences. “This will be the first time many of the horses have seen fences this big and it can be a daunting prospect, even for a well-fancied horse. It’s also the longest race of the year, which can take its toll on the favourites.”

Lightweights
Twenty-two of the past 25 winners have carried 11 stone or less. “With better horses running,” explains Balding, “the handicap system means there will be more horses carrying over 11 stone than ever before. Over four miles it has a telling impact. So horses with the top weight will run and jump really well, but from the second last fence to the line, they’ll get caught by a horse carrying a stone less in weight.”

The number 12

“If you’ve bred a nice mare you’d race her on the flat,” explains Clare Balding. “You wouldn’t teach her to jump and risk getting injured because mares have a breeding value so they nearly always get sent to stud instead.”

Before placing your once-a-year bet, look at the statistics below and you’ll see, historically, what makes a winner. And what’s not worth backing at all…

The name game
Only six winners in the past 50 years have included a human element in their name – the last being Monty’s Pass in 2003. Despite this poor return, bookmakers William Hill claim that these horses are always some of the most heavily backed.

Go green
Five of the past ten Grand National winning jockeys have had green as part of their racing colours, making it the luckiest tint.

Rrraring to go
Ten of the past 50 winning horses have had names that begin with R – including Rag Trade, Royal Athlete and the legendary Red Rum.

M is the next most successful initial letter with five winners in the same period.

The long view
Only two 100-1 shots have finished in the top four since 1980.

How old?
The optimum age for a horse in this race is nine. Since 1900, a nine-year-old has won 35 times. “Nine-year-olds are at the age where they’re strong and experienced enough without being over the hill,” explains Clare Balding, who’s presenting BBC1’s coverage. “They’re still improving so they can stay ahead of the handicap system, but they’ve got the maturity to win.”

The right odds
Bookmakers William Hill claim that, taken as an average of the previous 50 winners, 12-1 are the right odds when looking to back a winner.

But with five winners each in the past 50 years, 14-1 and 28-1 are the most successful odds. There have been four winners at 7-1 in the same period.

Top trumps
Only six of the past 50 favourites have won.

Jockey Richard Dunwoody, who won on second favourite West Tip in 1986, blames the fences. “This will be the first time many of the horses have seen fences this big and it can be a daunting prospect, even for a well-fancied horse. It’s also the longest race of the year, which can take its toll on the favourites.”

Lightweights
Twenty-two of the past 25 winners have carried 11 stone or less. “With better horses running,” explains Balding, “the handicap system means there will be more horses carrying over 11 stone than ever before. Over four miles it has a telling impact. So horses with the top weight will run and jump really well, but from the second last fence to the line, they’ll get caught by a horse carrying a stone less in weight.”

Boy’s own
Only 12 mares have ever won this race, the last being Nickel Coin in 1951.

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“If you’ve bred a nice mare you’d race her on the flat,” explains Clare Balding. “You wouldn’t teach her to jump and risk getting injured because mares have a breeding value so they nearly always get sent to stud instead.”