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My Childhood

  • Drama
  • 1972
  • Bill Douglas
  • 44 mins
  • PG

Summary

The second part (My ain folk) of Bill Douglas' influential trilogy harks back to his impoverished upbringing in early-'40s Scotland. Cinema was his only escape - he paid for it with the money he made from returning empty jam jars - and this escape is reflected most closely at this time of his life as an eight-year-old living on the breadline with his half-brother and sick grandmother in a poor mining village.

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Review

A star rating of 3 out of 5.

Costing some £4,000 to make and lasting less than an hour, this is the first part of director Bill Douglas's autobiographical trilogy, one of the most painful evocations of childhood ever brought to the screen. Set in a run-down Scottish mining village, the film explores the strained relationships between an eight-year-old boy, his half-brother, his uncompromising grandmother and a kindly German prisoner of war. Stephen Archibald gives a remarkable performance as Douglas's alter ego, while Jean Taylor-Smith sends shivers as the very antithesis of a loving granny. Mick Campbell's stark black-and-white photography makes the relentless chill of poverty almost tangible.

How to watch

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Credits

Cast

rolename
JamieStephen Archibald
TommyHughie Restorick
GrandmotherJean Taylor-Smith
HelmuthKarl Fieseler
Tommy's fatherBernard McKenna
Jamie's fatherPaul Kermack
Tommy's motherHelena Gloag

Crew

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DirectorBill Douglas

Details

Languages
English | German
Available on
video and DVD
Formats
Black and white
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