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The Crying Game

  • Drama
  • 1992
  • Neil Jordan
  • 107 mins
  • 18

Summary

Oscar-winning drama starring Stephen Rea, Miranda Richardson and Forest Whitaker. Jody, a black British soldier serving in Armagh, is kidnapped by an IRA group who intend to exchange him for one of their imprisoned members. While being held hostage, Jody slowly forms a friendship with his guard Fergus and, fearing for his safety, tells him to look after his lover back in London - the enigmatic hairdresser Dil.

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Review

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Something of a sleeper release, this offbeat tale went on to become a monster hit in America and even earned an Oscar for best original screenplay for writer/director Neil Jordan. It's a beguiling, eccentric blend of romantic drama and political thriller, and at its centre is a charismatic performance from Stephen Rea. He plays an IRA terrorist who flees to London after the botched kidnapping of a British soldier, played somewhat unconvincingly by Forest Whitaker. Ridden with guilt, he locates the dead man's former lover (an extraordinary performance from Jaye Davidson that was deservedly Oscar-nominated) and finds himself falling in love. After a series of Hollywood flops, this marked a major return to form for Jordan. And the future also looked rosy for Davidson, who won a major role in Stargate but has done little of significance since.

How to watch

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Credits

Cast

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FergusStephen Rea
JudeMiranda Richardson
DilJaye Davidson
JodyForest Whitaker
MaguireAdrian Dunbar
TinkerBreffni McKenna
EddieJoe Savino
TommyBirdie Sweeney
JaneAndrée Bernard
ColJim Broadbent
DaveRalph Brown (2)
DeverouxTony Slattery
FranknumJack Carr
Bar performerJosephine White
JudgeBrian Coleman
Security manRay De-Haan
Bar performerShar Campbell
Security manDavid Crionelly

Crew

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DirectorNeil Jordan

Details

Theatrical distributor
Mayfair Entertainment
Guidance
Contains violence, swearing and nudity.
Available on
video, DVD and Blu-ray
Formats
Colour
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