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Sound of Cinema: The Music That Made the Movies

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S1-E3 New Frontiers

S1-E3 New Frontiers

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Review

Be prepared for bleeps, drones and otherworldly noises as Neil Brand concludes his exemplary series with a look at how electronic music and technology changed how film soundtracks were made. From Miklos Rozsa’s early use of the theremin in the soundtrack to Hitchcock’s Spellbound to the complex sound design for Apocalypse Now, no stone is left unturned, no synthesizer knob left untwiddled.

Brand is a hands-on presenter who’s as happy demonstrating how to play scales on a theremin as he is interviewing acclaimed soundtrackers. Watch for the rare interview with Vangelis, in which he cracks a great joke about Mr Bean and the main theme from Chariots of Fire.

Summary

Neil Brand looks at how developing technology has taken film soundtracks in new directions and changed perceptions on how they should be made. He tries his hand at playing a theremin, the early Russian instrument that Miklos Rozsa used to evoke a sense of psychological disturbance in Alfred Hitchcock's movies and talks to Vangelis, who shares his inspiration for the Chariots of Fire and Blade Runner scores. The presenter also interviews Walter Murch and Carter Burwell, before Clint Mansell explains how electronic technology allowed him to become an acclaimed composer despite his lack of formal musical training. Last in the series.

Cast & Crew

Presenter Neil Brand
Guest Walter Murch
Guest Carter Burtwell
Guest Vangelis
Director John Das
Executive Producer Michael Poole
Series Producer John Das
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Arts

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