US Facebook users call police on 911 for help during 30-minute worldwide outage

LA County Sheriff's Office official is forced to take to Twitter to remind panicked social media junkies that “Facebook is not a law enforcement issue”

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US Facebook users call police on 911 for help during 30-minute worldwide outage
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What would you do in a world without Facebook? Imagine not being able to idly waste hours scrolling through endless pictures of people you barely know whilst commenting on inane status updates from three days ago and posting your highscore from Candy Crush. Just imagine if these undeniable human rights were to be taken away from you for say, half an hour… what would you do?

Well, if you’re one of several people living in California – you’d call the police and ask them if they can help, so it seems.

Yes, that’s right, some Facebookers in America were apparently so concerned by the brief worldwide outage of the social network yesterday that they dialled the emergency services on 911 in hope of finding answers. 

#Facebook is not a Law Enforcement issue, please don't call us about it being down, we don't know when FB will be back up!” wrote Sgt Burton Brink of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department on Twitter. 

After questioning from other social media users on the issue, Brink later added: “Yes we got calls #facebookdown That is why I sent out my previous msg to prevent them. Unk number received on 911 or reg number TY #LASD

Facebook responded to the 30-minute worldwide outage – the second such event in the past two months - by releasing a statement that read "Facebook is currently experiencing an issue that is affecting all API and web surfaces. Our engineers detected the issue quickly and are working to resolve it ASAP. We will update shortly."

Perhaps they should also have asked their users to be patient and not start calling the emergency services until they’d counted to a hundred. We all live and learn. 

As we speak, Facebook is not down. Please put down your mobile phone and return to ‘liking’ things you don’t really like.