Doctor Who: Help send a real-life TARDIS into space

A new Kickstarter campaign plans to launch a real-life replica of the Doctor's time machine into orbit to coincide with the 50th anniversary

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Doctor Who: Help send a real-life TARDIS into space
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Before you ask, yes, this is really happening. In a case of life imitating art, a team of Doctor Who fans have built a TARDIS satellite and are now raising money to get it into space in conjunction with the sci-fi series' 50th anniversary on 23 November 2013. 

Using the Kickstarter crowfunding scheme, which recently raised backing for the new Veronica Mars movie, a father and daughter team have constructed a TARDIS satellite, complete with its blinking blue light, to send into Low Earth Orbit - the altitude at which we find the International Space Station. 

The Tardis blueprintUsing the payload bay of a commercial rocket, the trio of dedicated Whovians need a sum of $33,000 to send their creation into orbit - and they're offering backers a host of Doctor Who-related treats as a thank you. Pledge $5 and your name will be entered onto a hard drive that will be housed within the TARDIS's doors and travel into space when it launches. Donate $25 and your name and a tweet-sized message can be added. Put up $45 and you become the lucky owner of a snazzy "KEEP CALM AND ORBIT ON" t-shirt and poster, plus a blueprint of the TARDIS satellite. Pledge over $300 and you have up to 5MB of space to upload as much content as you wish to the TARDIS's memory.

Keep Calm and Orbit On t-shirtThe entire project is to be filmed for a short documentary, mentioning all the backers in a special thank you message at the end and keen supporters can also keep abreast of the TARDIS's progress when photos taken from inside the satellite are uploaded onto a dedicated website. 

Funding for the ambitious project opened on 30 May and with 22 days to go, over $21,000 has already been donated. If the team raise anything above their goal, they've promised to make the TARDIS bigger, with $382,000 needed to launch a full-sized replica. So, if you fancy having a hand in sending a real-life version of the Doctor's time machine into orbit, follow this link to their Kickstarter page and stump up some cash. Or if you're after some more details from the team themselves, take a look at their video below...