Doctor Who Confidential-style content to be made available for series seven via official website

“It’s really sad we don’t have Confidential any more," says exec producer "but we have a team on set coming up with some really fun features”

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Doctor Who Confidential-style content to be made available for series seven via official website
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When BBC3 behind-the-scenes series Doctor Who Confidential was axed last September, fans were incensed. A campaign aimed at saving the show quickly sprang up, with over 50,000 people signing an online peititon, and thousands joining dedicated Facebook and Twitter accounts.

But speaking today at the Edinburgh International Television Festival, BBC3 controller Zai Bennett defended the move, saying the show had run out of material.

"Doctor Who Confidential had run for six series," he said. "It was a show about a show. There wasn't much more to say about how they make Doctor Who."

Doctor Who executive producer Caro Skinner is among those who would disagree: “I think it’s really sad that we don’t have Confidential any more because the fans are fascinated with the making of Doctor Who and the personalities involved,” she told RadioTimes.com, during a recent visit to the set of Doctor Who series seven opener Asylum of the Daleks.

And Skinner had good news for fans of Confidential's behind-the-scenes content, revealing that material from the new series of Doctor Who would continue to be made available to viewers via the show's official website.

“We will be doing lots of content that will be in smaller chunks on the site,” said Skinner. “It won’t be related to the Confidential brand because it was a BBC decision to let that go. But we have a team of people on set coming up with some really fun features.” 

Meanwhile, Zai Bennett also backed the decision not to commission a second run of Bafta-winning supernatural drama series The Fades - which was also executive produced by Skinner - claiming it "didn't engage with young adults" and was watched by a "much older" audience than BBC3’s 16-32 target market.

Caro Skinner was talking to David Brown