The Magdalene Sisters

  • 15
  • Peter Mullan (2002)
  • UK / Ire
  • 114 min
The Magdalene Sisters
Film Review
Reviewed By
4 out of 5

Religious repression and moral hypocrisy are targeted by writer/director Peter Mullan in this bitter indictment of the Magdalene Asylums - convent laundries that were run like workhouses - into which "fallen women" were forced in order to cleanse their "sins". Following three wayward teenagers sent to one such asylum in the 1960s, Mullan's fictionalised version of actual events keeps soapy sentimentality at bay, thanks mainly to the compelling performances of a young cast of unknowns - Eileen Walsh is especially outstanding as the tragic Crispina. Geraldine McEwan is frighteningly good as the bullying Mother Superior, hoarding money from the sanctified exploitation of the girls, beating them out of spite and turning a blind eye to their sexual abuse at the hands of the priests. Often uncomfortable to watch, Mullan's controversial chronicle is not without flaws in its credibility, but these are compensated for by his sincere intentions and moving depiction of lost souls, so stripped of their dignity that they view this living hell as their only refuge.

Plot Summary

Period drama starring Geraldine McEwan. In 1960s Dublin, three so-called wayward teenage girls are subjected to a life of humiliation and abuse when they are forced to work in a convent laundry run by a sadistic nun.

Cast and crew

Cast

Sister Bridget
Geraldine McEwan
Margaret
Anne-Marie Duff
Bernadette
Nora-Jane Noone
Rose / Patricia
Dorothy Duffy
Crispina
Eileen Walsh
Una
Mary Murray
Katy
Britta Smith
Sister Jude
Frances Healy
Sister Clementine
Eithne McGuinness

Crew

Director
Peter Mullan

Other Information

Language: 
English
Colour
Theatrical distributor: 
Momentum Pictures
Guidance: 
Violence, swearing and nudity.
Available on video and DVD
Released 21 Feb 2003
Certificate 15
Distributor:
Momentum Pictures
Categories
Drama

Add new comment